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Transported Convicts (1)

Thomas Jeynes

Thomas Jeynes was born in 1789 and worked as a traveling razor grinder and brazier. He married Penelope Rose in December 1818 in Minchinhampton and had at least three children. In November 1839, he was arrested in Coleford for the theft of two asses, a saddle and a bridle. On 31 December at the age of 50, he was convicted and sentenced to be transported for 7 years. After a spell on a hulk, he was transferred to the David Clarke which set sail for Van Diemen’s Land on 7 June 1841 arriving on 4 October 1841. He obtained his ticket of leave on 18 April 1845 and a certificate of freedom on 10 January 1848.

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Transported Convicts (1)

Thomas James

Thomas James was born in 1799 in English Bicknor where he continued to live and worked as a tailor. On 9 April 1827, at the age of 27, he was convicted of the theft of one sheep owned by Richard Bennett and was sentenced to death commuted to be transportation for life. After a spell on a hulk, he was transferred to the Florentia which set sail for New South Wales on 15 September 1827.

 

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Transported Convicts (1)

Robert Hyett

 

Robert Hyett was born in 1805 in Awre. On 2 June 1817, he absconded from service as an apprentice and was sentenced to 21 days in prison. He then worked as a labourer in Blakeney. On 3 August 1826, at the age of 21 he was sentenced to transportation for life for the theft of three half-crowns and four shillings from Richard Peters, a labourer. After a spell on a hulk, he was transferred to the Andromeda which set sale on 14 Oct 1826 and arrived in Van Diemen’s Land on 23 Feb 1827.

He was employed in public works. He received a ticket of leave on 13 April 1831 but absconded on 2 December 1842 and 24 March 1843. His ticket of leave was revoked on 12 April 1843. He received a new ticket of leave on 12 August 1848 and a conditional pardon on 28 April 1851 and 10 July 1852. He married Margaret Robertson and had a daughter born on 28 June 1852.

He possibly returned to Gloucestershire.

 

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Transported Convicts (1)

William Hulin

 

William Hulin was born in 1810 in St Briavels where he worked as a labourer. At the age of 22, on 13 Oct 1832, he was convicted of the theft of a gander valued at 3 shillings, the property of John Burton, and sentenced to be transported of 7 years. He had been discharged from court on two occasions before having been found not guilty or no evidence presented.  After a spell on a hulk, he was transferred to the Asia I which set sail for New South Wales on 4 February 1833 and arrived in Australia on 27 June 1833.

Hulin married Mary Donohoe, also a convict, on 21 April 1840 in Maitland, and went on to have five children. Donohoe was born in 1917 and was from Donegal and had been transported on 3 Dec 1829 to Van Diemen’s Land on 5 January 1830.

William Hulin died on 19 February 1877 in Singleton.

 

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Transported Convicts (1)

William Harris (2)

 

William Harris (2) was born in 1818 and lived in Joyford where he worked as a collier. On 21 September 1832 William Harris aged 13 and his brother James aged 9 were sentenced to 12 months in prison for stealing two sheep.  At the age of 23, on March 1840, William Harris was sentenced to transportation for life for burglary. After a spell on a hulk, he was transferred to the Lord Lyndoch which set sail for Van Diemen’s Land on 11 September 1840 and arrived 5 February 1841.

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Transported Convicts (1)

William Evans (2)

 

William Evans (2) was born in 1811 in Tidenham.  He was married with two children and worked as a labourer. He was sentenced to three months in prison on two occasions for poaching and once for theft.  In March 1838, at the age of 25, he was sentenced to be transported for 15 years for the burglary of a warehouse. After a spell on a hulk, he was transferred to the Gilmour which set sail for Tasmania on 5 October 1838 and arrived on 24 January 1839.

He was granted a conditional pardon on 10 August 1847.  On 27 July 1848, he drowned in the Swan River, Tasmania.

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Transported Convicts (1)

William Evans (1)

 

William Evans (1) was born in 1824 in East Dean and worked as a farm labourer.  On 3 July 1838, at the age of 14, he was sentenced to 6 months in prison and twice whipped for stealing a pair of trousers.  In October 1845, at the age of 21, he was transported for 7 years for stealing a bar of iron and twelve scissors valued at 5 shillings from the Forest of Dean Coal Mining Company. After a spell on a hulk, he was transferred to the Joseph Somes which set sail for Tasmania on 22 December 1845 and arrived in Tasmania on 19 May 1846.

He was given his ticket of leave on 24 Dec 1849. He married Sarah Reavely on 29 December 1851 and had twelve children. Sarah was sentenced to transported for 15 years for arson in July 1849.

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Transported Convicts (1)

William Drew

William Drew was born in Blakeney in 1815. On 12 April 1831, aged 16, he was sentenced to six months in the house of correction at Northleach and whipped for stealing a coat with the value of 4s. He moved to Alvington and gained work as a collier. On 8 October 1839, at the age of 24, Drew was sentenced to 10 years transportation for burglary with an intent to commit a felony. After a spell on the hulks, he was transferred to the Mangles which set sail for New South Wales on 29 November 1839 and arrived on 27 April 1840. The majority of the convicts were landed at Norfolk Island.

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Transported Convicts (1)

William Creese

William Creese was born in 1802 and worked as a butcher in Yorkley. On 4 April 1835, at the age of 33, he was sentenced to transportation for life for the theft of four sheep, the property of Walter Taylor, Daniel White and William Packer. After spending the summer on a hulk, he was transferred to the John Barry which set sail for to New South Wales on 21 Sept 1835 and arrived on 17 Jan 1836. On 1 November 1848, he received a conditional pardon.

 

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Transported Convicts (1)

Forest of Dean Transported Convicts

In the years 1783-1842 approximately sixty men and women from the Forest of Dean were transported to Australia often for committing minor crimes against property. The lists on the right briefly outline the stories behind their transportation. This is ongoing research so there may be mistakes. I plan to add to more convicts and expand on their stories with further research.