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God’s Beautiful Sunshine

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Transported Convicts (1833-1835)

Richard Dew

Richard Dew was born in 1809 and lived in Clearwell. He was married with two children. On 10 August 1833, at the age of 21, he was sentenced to transportation for life for stealing a lamb near Clearwell, the property of Richard Ebborne, with Stephen Evans. Consequently, on 28 Aug 1833, he was transferred to the hulk, the Justitia, and then to the ship, the Moffatt which set sail on 4 January 1834. Richard Dew died of pneumonia during the voyage, two weeks after leaving Plymouth, on 19 January 1834.

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Transported Convicts (1789-1826)

Richard Sadler (alias Cox)

Richard Sadler (alias Cox) was born in 1794 and lived in Awre where he worked as a labourer. On 31 March 1819, at the age of 25, he was sentenced to death which was commuted to transportation for life for stealing three sheep from Thomas Packer of Newland. After a spell on the hulk, Justitia, he was transferred to the Neptune which set sail for New South Wales on 23 March 1820.

He was given a ticket of leave on 28 August 1838 and a conditional pardon on 2 March 1846.

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Transported Convicts (1789-1826)

John Wathen

John Wathen was born in 1778 and lived in Westbury-on-Severn. On 11 January 1817, at the age of 39, he was convicted of stealing from John Smith the following items; a rug, 11 plates, 2 salts, 2 vinegar bottles, 2 glasses, 2 saucers, a jug and a sugar basin. He was sentenced to be transported for 7 years. After a spell on the hulk, the Justitia, he was transferred to the Lord Eldon which set sail for New South Wales on 9 April 1817 and arrived on 30 September 1817. He obtained his certificate of freedom on 15 January 1824.

 

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Transported Convicts (1789-1826)

John Cecil

John Cecil was born in 1787 in Tidenham where he worked as a labourer. In April 1816 he was charged with breaking into the property of the Reverend Thomas Thomas of Tidenham and stealing one tin pint and several other articles. However, when he appeared before the Summer Assizes on 17 August 1816, he was found not guilty. On 11 January 1821, at the age of 34, he was convicted of theft and sentenced to be transported for 7 years. His prison records state:

“John Cecil, aged 34, committed November 4, 1820, by Thomas Thomas, Clerk, charged on the oaths of Alexander Trotter, John Morgan, and others, with having, on or about the 6th day of October last, feloniously stolen, taken, and carried away a quantity of elm lath, the property of his Grace the Duke of Beaufort, from a farm-yard in the occupation of the said Alexander Trotter, in the parish of Wollaston: And also, on suspicion of having feloniously stolen, taken, and carried away six oak boards, the property of  the said Alexander Trotter, from his farm-yard at Tidenham.”

After a spell on the hulk, the Justitia, he was transferred to the Adamant which set sail for New South Wales on 19 March 1821 and arrived on 8 September 1821.

 

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Transported Convicts (1789-1826)

John Boxall

John Boxall was born in Blakeney in 1786. At the age of 16, he joined the 90th Foot Soldiers, 2nd Battalion and then returned to Blakeney where he worked as a labourer. On 15 April 1817, at the age of 31, he was convicted of breaking into a waggon belonging to George Playne while it travelled from Minchinhampton to Bristol and stealing a quantity of woollen cloth while it was in Thornbury. He was sentenced to be transported for 7 years. After a spell on the hulk, the Justitia, he was transferred to the Batavia which set sail for New South Wales on 1 November 1817 and arrived on 5 April 1818.

Boxall obtained his certificate of freedom on 15 April 1824 and died in Sydney on 15 June 1839.

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Transported Convicts (1789-1826)

John Baglin

John Baglin was born in 1799 in English Bicknor where he worked as a collier. On 9 April 1827, at the age of 28, he was convicted with Thomas James for the theft of a sheep owned by Richard Bennett and sentenced to death commuted to transportation for life. After a spell on the hulk, the Justitia, he was transferred to the Florentia which set sail for New South Wales on 15 September 1827 and arrived on 3 January 1828.  He received a conditional pardon in November 1848.

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Transported Convicts (1835-1839)

Thomas Edmunds

Thomas Edmunds was born in 1820 and lived in Longhope where he worked as a labourer. On 6 March 1839, at the age of 19, he was sentenced to be transported for 10 years for breaking into the Longhope house of John Dawe with Uriah Prout and stealing a silver watch a purse a handkerchief and a piece of ribbon. After a spell on the hulk, the Ganymede, he was transferred to the Maitland which set sail for New South Wales on 22 March 1840 and arrived on 14 July 1840.

 

 

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Transported Convicts (1835-1839)

Uriah Prout

Uriah Prout was born in 1817 and lived in Longhope where he worked as a labourer. On 6 March 1839, at the age of 23, he was sentenced to be transported for 10 years for breaking into the Longhope house of John Dawe with Thomas Edmunds and stealing a silver watch, a purse, a handkerchief and a piece of ribbon. After a spell on the hulk, the Ganymede, he was transferred to the Maitland which set sail for New South Wales on 22 March 1840 and arrived on 14 July 1840.

He was given a ticket of leave on 27 December 1843

 

 

 

Categories
Transported Convicts (1835-1839)

Edward Bevan

Edward Bevan (alias Beard) was born in 1810 in Tidenham where he worked as a labourer. He married Harriet Vaughan on 30 December 1835 and had two daughters one of whom died as a baby.  On 31 March 1838, at the age of 28, he was convicted of breaking into the warehouse of William Court and stealing some candles and soap and sentenced to be transported for 15 years. After a spell on the hulk, the Ganymede, he was transferred to the Gilmore which set sail for Van Diemen’s Land on 5 October 1838 and arrived on 22 January 1839.

He obtained his ticket of leave on 8 March 1845. He married Euphemia Brown in June 1845 but she died on 29 April 1847. He was recommended for a conditional pardon on 29 April 1846 which was approved on 18 September 1847. His report stated:

“Having completed eight years and a quarter of a fifteen-year sentence and having maintained an excellent character in the colony.”

He married Ellen Brien on 13 June 1853 in Hobart and lived in Coal River Richmond where they had five children. Ellen died in 1862 and Bevan married Ellen Scofield and went on to have three more children. Edward Bevan died in Colebrook in Tasmania on 6 April 1895 aged 80.